No Nonsense letter

Why my dental practice is the way it is:

My slogan at the practice is Dentistry with Care. That is designed to reflect how I want my office to help people. The most significant thing that I can give patients is my time and CARE. I want their experience to be better than the experiences that I had when I was young. This quest for me has been for over 30 years now to try to give patients that come to see us the kind of experience at the dentist that I would like to have myself.

I was in pain with the way my dentist gave injections, and they weren’t effective at making my lower teeth numb. So, I give injections slowly and carefully and encourage my patients to give me feedback if they’re uncomfortable.  I also took classes and learned additional nerve block techniques and have purchased special syringes to work at getting even the most stubborn teeth numb. It takes time and is more costly to do, but it is how I would want to be treated, so it is what we do.

I was hurt when my dentist tried to work on me. When they tried to drill on me I would get jolts of absolutely  intolerable pain.  It was obvious to me that he didn’t really care about the pain, didn’t know how to fix it and that I was being annoying to him and the staff, as I was having a problem keeping still and ruining their schedule. This happened to me about six times or so and ended up leaving me with a lot of residual anxiety about going to the dentist.  In creating my dental practice I wanted to create a place where patients like me can go to have the kind of treatment that I would want myself. So I spent a fair amount of time and investing money into creating a place where my office can manage patients like myself. I hope that this comes through if you decide to use us to take care of you. First, I have private rooms and walls at the office for a reason. If I’m anxious about an injection or procedure I really don’t want somebody else witnessing that thank you, so you won’t either—we have walls. I never liked just sitting in that chair and counting the ceiling tiles while listening to the drill, that I came to fear. So,  I bought headphones and televisions on expanding arms so that there is noise blockade and you have something else to do than sit there and focus on us. The distraction helps.

I still have the memory of the old painful experiences ingrained in my mind. Enough so that going to the dentist for me is still extremely nerve racking. I can’t seem to get over that feeling that something awful is about to happen at any second. When I have dental procedures done I have sedation done to minimize the anxiety about the procedure.  So to take care of patients like me, I have trained for years  in sedation and have invested a lot of time and money into equipment to provide nitrous oxide, oral sedation and Intravenous sedation (only 4% of general dentists provide this service). Also, I sometimes bring an anesthesiologist into the office and have them provide a similar service to going to sleep for an operation in the hospital. The goal is that no matter how tense our patients are about a procedure we can tailor a method for them, be it minor or strong, to manage that tension about having the procedure done. That feeling of dread can be eliminated. We can handle it, no matter how great it is.

Quality of work performed: My fillings in my teeth didn’t last and I came to find out that the crowns done in that practice, on my parents were not done very well either. They didn’t fit the teeth very well and this led to early failures and a lot of work that needed re-done.  What I want when I go to the dentist is the best that can be done as I really don’t want to be there in the first place and I want to be there to have it re-done even less. I do not want assembly line type, mediocre to poor technical quality work, that fails early.  That has driven the technical training and substantial investment that I have made in training in comprehensive care. I have taken courses in reconstructive and comprehensive care since the early 90’s.  I have trained at the Kois Center and am a Clinical Instructor there as I believe that it offered the most advanced post-doctoral curriculum available. I use Kois Center partner Dental Laboratories, as the fit and esthetics of the work that they produce is far above any that I have ever seen. I have equipment and training to take care of almost all procedures with-in the walls of my office.  But more than anything else I take the time to sit down and work at really trying to get it right. All of this is designed to provide the very best of care in all facets of what we do. It takes a lot more time and care and cost but again it is what I want when I go to a dentist.

So this is why our practice is designed the way it is. We are not a “discount practice”, as I know that I am not going to be able to be a comfortable patient in that type of dental facility where they don’t have time for personal attention and attention to technical excellence. I would be a comfortable patient in my practice and that has been our driving force since 1990.

Cavities: Myths and Hopes

The Caries Infection

Cavities are holes or soft spots that form in teeth as a result of the caries disease. Caries is an infection with the type of bacteria that can cause these holes in teeth. An infection is 1) an abnormal amount of bacteria, 2) bacteria that are living in an abnormal place, or 3) both. The caries disease is an abnormal amount of the type of mouth bacteria that like to make and live in acid. It is located in the thin biofilm on your teeth. Most types of bacteria living in the mouth are not acid loving and do not contribute to making cavities.

Contracting caries most often results from a variety of things happening simultaneously. First, you need to get the kind of germs that cause cavities (cariogenic) introduced into your mouth. They are often transmitted through common interactions like kissing and the sharing of foods and utensils. Then, conditions have to be right for those bacteria to settle and replace some of the non-cavity causing bacteria living in the biofilm on your teeth. Those conditions are made more favorable for the caries-type bacteria by having a diet that is high in the frequency of acidic foods. Also, a diet that frequently consists of sugar-containing foods allows the biofilm bacteria to make acid for about 30 minutes after each and every sugar exposure. These things create a favorable environment that allows the caries bacteria to multiply to a harmful level and become the infection.

Acquiring Cavities

Acquiring cavities, or holes in teeth, from this infection depends on several things. The first is saliva. Saliva protects teeth by washing away and diluting the acids, while simultaneously buffering teeth from the damage acids cause. People with dry-mouth problems caused by diseases or medications are especially prone to getting cavities, as they lack this protection. The next factor is the hardness of the tooth structure itself. Genetics play a role in this. Harder teeth are more resistant to acid attack. Tooth hardness can be changed with fluoride; it makes teeth harder, so acids can’t as easily dissolve them and make holes in them. Diet is a huge component! Sugar and acid attack the tooth structure every time they are in the mouth. The caries bacteria will make acid for about 30 minutes after each exposure to any sugar. Acid softens the teeth and eventually creates the hole or cavity. Lastly, having a lot of bacteria or a heavy amount of plaque on your teeth allows a greater number of bacteria to make more acid. When the layer of caries bacteria becomes very thick, more acid is produced. Getting cavities depends not only on having an abnormal amount of cariogenic bacteria but also on lower resistance to the bacteria’s harmful effects in the above categories. Some of these factors can be controlled by the patient, and some (like inherited tooth hardness) cannot.

Myths about cavities:

Myth #1

Brushing and flossing prevent cavities.

Brushing and flossing help minimize excess amounts of bacteria, but cavity-causing types of biofilm bacteria that live right against the tooth still remain after brushing and flossing in enough numbers to cause cavities.

Myth #2

Rinsing or brushing after eating sugar will prevent cavities.

The biofilm cavity-causing bacteria make acid for about 30 minutes after each sugar exposure. Rinsing and brushing don’t shorten this event.

Myth #3

Fluoride prevents cavities.

The tooth structure can be made more resistant to acid dissolution, but tooth enamel can’t be turned into to armor — the tooth can still dissolve with enough acid attacks.

Myth #4

Removing the decay from your teeth and placing dental restorations get rid of caries.

Removing the decay and placing dental restorations will fix the hole (the cavity), but it does not address the abnormally high level of acid-producing bacteria in the biofilm on all of the teeth. The caries infection in the biofilm remains. This is why patients often get cavities even after having dental work done.

Cavity-Prevention Tips

Though none of the tips below provide a cure for dental caries, when practiced together they make preventing the disease a real possibility.

  • Minimize the frequency of sugar and acid-containing foods in your diet.
  • Brush and floss to prevent excess bacteria from making extra acid on your teeth.
  • Rinse with a base-containing mouthwash (Cari-Free® treatment rinse followed by maintenance rinse) to expose the acidic biofilm bacteria to an acid-neutralizing base. This creates an environment that acid-producing bacteria don’t like.
  • Use prescription-strength fluoride toothpaste and rinses (such as Cari-Free toothpaste and maintenance rinse). This hardens the outer layer of the tooth and makes it harder to dissolve or decay.
  • Use high-concentration xylitol products (Cari-Free gum and/or lollipops). Xylitol is a sugar alcohol that hinders the harmful bacteria’s ability to make acid from sugar.
  • Get your cavities fixed so the holes don’t act as caries bacteria reservoirs.
  • Encourage friends and family to do the same in an effort minimize cross-infecting one another.
  • If you have a salivary flow problem, use xylitol moistening sprays (Cari-Free CTx2 spray). Avoid eating hard candies containing sugar, as the combination of sugar and dry mouth is destructive to healthy teeth. Ask us if you may be a candidate for pilocarpine medication to increase salivary flow.
  • Get dental checkups on a regular basis. If you’re getting cavities, you don’t want the situation to worsen.

These things all work together, and the more of them you do, the fewer problems you’re likely to have. Our office stocks a number of Cari-Free products, like the CTx4 Toothpaste, CTx3 Rinse and the CTx4 Treatment Rinse. If we’re out of stock, or if you see something on their website (CariFree.com) that we don’t normally carry, let us know and we’ll get it ordered for you. Quite simply, they are the best we’ve found so far.

We are working on implementing a new diagnostic protocol in the office to try to help patients monitor their cavity risk and prevention progress.

Do Whitening Toothpastes Really Work?

The effectiveness of whitening toothpastes on your teeth will depend on why they don’t look white in the first place.

Whitening toothpastes chemically or mechanically help to remove stain on the tooth surface. There is no evidence that they can whiten teeth from internal discoloration. The only whitening agents in toothpastes are abrasives that help rub off stains from coffee, tea, or red wine, for example.

If you believe your teeth are not as white as they should be, Eric Yaremko DMD, PS can advise you on which whitening method would work best for you. Because most toothpastes contain mild abrasives, they may not be strong enough to remove heavy external stains that need to be scaled and polishes off professionally at our office.

Do You Know How Food Affects Your Teeth?

We all know it’s good to brush your teeth at least twice a day. It’s even better to brush after eating, but unfortunately most of us don’t have the time for that.

Cavities form as a result of tooth decay. Tooth decay is caused by the acidity in foods. Acidity levels, also known as pH levels vary by the type of food and drink.

Take a look at the pH Level chart below to see if what you are eating or drinking is increasing your risk for cavities.

cavities and tooth decay

If it’s been over six months since you have seen Dr. Yaremko, make sure to book your appointment with Eric Yaremko DMD, PS. in Bellingham, WA to ensure that your teeth stay healthy. Your hygienist at our office can also provide you with other ways to prevent tooth decay.

Strawberry Kiwi Smoothie – A Recipe For Strong, Healthy Teeth

Keep your smile bright and your teeth healthy! Just like your bones, your teeth stay strong when you consume enough calcium and vitamin D. Milk, Strawberries and broccoli are all foods that can help prevent trips to the dentist. Enjoy this Strawberry-Kiwi Smoothie to get some cavity-fighting nutrients.

Refreshing and easy to make, one serving provides almost twice the amount of vitamin C you need for an entire day! Consume tooth-strengthening calcium and vitamin D from the milk in this strawberry smoothie.

During your next appointment at Eric Yaremko, DMD, PS make sure to ask your hygienist for other tips for keeping your smile bright.

Prep Time: 10 mins
Servings: 2

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups fat-free milk
  • 1 cup strawberries, hulled and quartered
  • 2 kiwi, peeled and quartered (about 1/2 cup)
  • 2 tablespoon mint, fresh, chopped, plus two sprigs for garnish (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon sugar, granulated, or sugar substitute
  • 1 cup ice cubes, crushed

Preparation

Combine the milk, strawberries, kiwis, chopped mint, sugar or sugar substitute, and ice in a blender or food processor. Blend until desired consistency.  Garnish with fresh mint and serve.

Nutrition Facts

Amount per Serving
Calories: 155
Total Fat: 0 g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 81 mg
Total Carbohydrate: 32 g
Dietary Fiber: 4 g
Protein: 8 g

Source: JoyBauer.com